ABOUT THE OLD FOURTH WARD

Today the Old Fourth Ward is one of Atlanta’s fastest growing neighborhoods. 

OUR NAME IS FROM BEFORE THE CIVIL WAR

The Old Fourth Ward is defined by Ponce de Leon Avenue to the north, the Atlanta Beltline to the east, Decatur/Dekalb Avenue to the south, and Peachtree Street to the west.  The community’s name dates from the decade prior to the Civil War, when the City of Atlanta was divided into wards.  Located northeast of the city’s central business district, the Fourth Ward grew quickly into a community of diverse demographics and business opportunities.  After the turn of the 20th century, increasing numbers of African-American businesses, churches, and civic institutions established themselves along the “Sweet Auburn” corridor, and residential development boomed along surrounding streets.  In 1917, fire swept through the heart of the Old Fourth Ward, consuming thousands of residences and businesses and forever altering the social and physical landscape of the community.

Today the Old Fourth Ward is one of Atlanta’s fastest growing neighborhoods.  Businesses and residents alike are drawn to the community’s rich historical roots, now showcased in the context of new transportation systems and public spaces.  The Fire in the Fourth festival aims to celebrate the community’s ongoing revitalization by attracting residents of surrounding neighborhoods as well as visitors from the greater Atlanta area.

Economic Investment: Recently updated economic development numbers show that since funding was announced in 2010 for the Atlanta Streetcar, $561 million in capital investment for 35 projects has been completed within a five-minute walk of the route. Another 10 projects worth $172 million are currently under construction and 24 projects worth another $511 million are currently planned or proposed.

Additionally, nearly $900,000 of public funds have been slated to be invested through Invest Atlanta’s Facade Improvement Program, which awarded 12 locally owned businesses the resources to repair and improve the exteriors of their buildings along Edgewood and Auburn Avenues.